Japanese Kanji for Beginners - Tuesdays 7:30-8:45pm, from 12th November

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Japanese Kanji for Beginners - Tuesdays 7:30-8:45pm, from 12th November

90.00

Kanji (Chinese characters used in Japanese) can be complex and confusing. They can also be beautiful, fascinating and funny:

木 means tree, 林 means wood and 森 is a forest…

一 is one, 二 is two and 三 is three… so why is four 四?

Why is the kanji for home (家), a pig (豕) in a house (宀)?

The Japanese writing system uses a combination of three different “alphabets”. Hiragana and katakana are simple phonetic alphabets, which can be learned fairly quickly, but to become a fluent reader of Japanese you will also need to learn at least 2000 kanji (Chinese characters used in Japanese).

For many students, therefore, learning kanji is the greatest burden when learning Japanese. The good news? It’s also really, really interesting!

This 5-week short course offers an introduction to Japanese kanji for students at beginner level and above.

What’s the best way to learn kanji? And what can kanji teach us about Japanese culture?

This 5-week course will cover:

  • What are kanji?

  • How to read kanji

  • The 100 most common kanji for everyday life in Japan

  • What does it mean to “know” a kanji?

  • How to look up unknown kanji in a dictionary

  • Making mnemonics to learn kanji

  • Using kanji radicals to your advantage

  • Kanji resources for self-study

Around 100 kanji will be introduced in five weeks – roughly equivalent to the kanji required for the JLPT (Japanese Language Proficiency Test) N5 level.

This course will be delivered in English. Knowledge of hiragana and/or katakana will be helpful but is not essential.

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Course Dates

Tuesdays from 12th November to 10th December 2019

Location

Courses are held at the Friends Centre at Brighton Junction, New England Street, Brighton - in beautiful rooms just 2 minutes from Brighton station.

Course fee

£90 for 5 sessions (each session is 1hr 15min)

Booking is essential and all fees must be paid in advance

Class size

This course will run with a minimum of 4 and a maximum of 12 students.

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About me - your teacher

Fran Wrigley is a kanji enthusiast and Japanese teacher based in Brighton who is not very good at writing about herself in the third person.

I learned kanji as an adult - like you!

I used the Heisig method to learn kanji (it worked for me, but I don’t necessarily recommend it), combined with an attitude of endless curiosity, and a lot of manga and Japanese books.

You can write “Fran” in kanji as 富蘭, lovely kanji which means something like “an abundance of flowers”. Or you can write it as 腐卵, which means “rotten eggs”. I prefer the latter.

My favourite kanji is 笑 (warai; laughter) because it looks like a smiling face. My least favourite kanji pair is 左 and 右 (left and right), because I can never remember whether the top line goes from left to right or right to left.