What's the Difference Between Mina and Minna (And Why Does It Matter Anyway?)


皆さん、こんにちは。

Hello everybody!

If you watch Japanese tv or anime (or are paying attention in class) you've probably come across the Japanese word 皆さん (mina-san) meaning "all" or "everybody".

But what's the difference between みな and みんな? What's みなさま all about? And ... does it actually matter?

皆さん Mina-san


Mina means "everybody", and it's commonly used with "-san" on the end (the same suffix you put on people's names to be polite).

みなさん is often used when addressing a group of people, especially when they don't know either other too well or the situation calls for a slightly more formal greeting.

I find myself using みなさん a bunch at the beginning of term when welcoming students back and/or trying to get you all to listen to me.

As you might expect, YouTubers say みなさんこんにちは a lot too ("HI EVERYONE").

Check out the first five seconds of this video from Ari Keita:

↓ はい、みなさんこんにちはありけいたです!



These example sentences from jisho.org should give you a good idea of the kinds of situation when みなさん is used:


みんな Minna


Also common is みんな which is just a spoken form of みな. Some people will tell you minna is more casual than mina and technically they're right.

Examples from jisho seem to show us that people also use minna when they talk about everyone:



みんなさん Minna-san


You can't mix them up and use みんなさん though. That's technically incorrect.

Probably no one will mind or notice in a casual situation, but if you're trying to be polite, stick with みなさん.

Or you can even go more polite with...

皆様 Mina-sama


In more formal situations, the -san suffix is switched up to the more polite/formal -sama.

Mina-sama functions a lot like "LADIES AND GENTLEMEN", and is used in writing, and in announcements:


Why does this matter? Well really, which word you use is going to depend on the situation.

Mina-sama is super formal and it would sound weird if you use it with your friends. Likewise, minna is pretty casual and might not be appropriate in a business setting.

A lot of gaining fluency in a language is about choosing the right word for the right situation.

Mina-san, if you'd like to learn more Japanese with me, click here to check out my new Japanese language courses in Brighton!